CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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More in Politics—Comparative and International Politics. Moreover, bossism is found throughout the world and in modern history. Poverty and insecurity leave bossissm voters vulnerable to clientelist, coercive, and financial pressure, and the state’s central role in capital accumulation provides the basis for local bosses’ economic empires and political machines.

References to this book Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Contemporary Issues in Asia and the Pacific. The book elaborates these arguments through case ahd of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. Review “This book is certainly a contribution to the literature on Philippine politics, comparative politics, and state-society relations. The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5. Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development.

Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development. User Review – Boseism as inappropriate Politacal Milestone.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines – John Thayer Sidel – Google Books

This is because bossism both relies coerclon and reinforces the deplorable status quo in terms of widespread poverty, inequality, landlessness, lawlessness, and other socio-economic ills. Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

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The SmallTown Dynasties of Cebu.

In fact, when bossism in other countries is considered, the key culprit seems to be, not a particular structural flaw in the development of national institutions, but electoral democracy itself. My library Help Advanced Book Search. Capital, coercion, and crime: McCoy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Of course, whether or not any election is legitimate or truly democratic is debatable. These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries.

The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

bsosism Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

Remember me on this computer. This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources. Account Options Sign in. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.

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The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. The body of the text is devoted to the development of diverse and locally specific forms of bossism in the provinces of Cavite and Cebu.

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The comparative examples presented in the final chapter do not conclusively reinforce his assertions, nor do they show that an alternative institutional bossjsm or sequence of political and economic developments would have prevented the emergence of bosses. The DistrictLevel Dynasties of Cebu.

These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries.

Physical description p. Probing beneath the superficialities of election rituals, Sidel discovers the dynamics of a political-economic process of systemic coercion and corruption that may trouble the democratic transition in many newer nations and regies for decades to come.

Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. A highly centralized state apparatus composed entirely of un-elected persons hardly seems democratic. Kerkvliet Limited preview – Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand.